Inability to synthesise hyaline cartilage

WhatsApp Development of BioPen. However, both MACI and ACI are complex, multistage procedures that require a double operation; first for surgical excision of native cartilage, followed by expansion of adult chondrocytes in vitro prior to implantation by a second operation.

Inability to synthesise hyaline cartilage

A surgical implant for replacing cartilage in a mammalian joint, comprising a hydrogel material made from a synthetic polymer and having at least one smooth and lubricious surface with a negative electrical charge density that promotes lubricious interactions with mammalian synovial fluid.

Results for hyalinecartilagecom | Orthopaedic Seminar

The surgical implant of claim 1, wherein the smooth and lubricious surface contains atoms selected from the group consisting of sulfur and fluorine.

The surgical implant of claim 1, wherein the smooth and lubricious surface has been treated with a chemical reagent that creates crosslinking bonds between polymeric molecules. The surgical implant of claim 1, wherein the implant has an anchoring surface provided with means for anchoring the implant to a prepared bone surface.

The surgical implant of claim 6, wherein the means for anchoring the implant to a prepared bone surface comprises pegs that are designed to fit into accommodating receptacles that can be inserted into a prepared bone surface prior to insertion of the surgical implant into an articulating joint.

The surgical implant of claim 6, wherein at least a portion of the anchoring surface comprises a porous material that promotes ingrowth of tissue after surgical implantation. The surgical implant of claim 1, wherein the implant has two smooth and lubricious surfaces, and is sized and designed to replace meniscal or labrum tissue.

Hyaline articular cartilage - ScienceDirect

The surgical implant of claim 1, wherein a flexible fibrous reinforcing matrix is embeddded within at least a portion of the hydrogel material.

A surgical implant for replacing cartilage in a mammalian joint, comprising a hydrogel material containing a flexible fibrous reinforcing matrix embedded within at least a portion of the hydrogel material, and having at least one smooth and lubricious surface with a negative electrical charge density that promotes lubricious interactions with mammalian synovial fluid.

The surgical implant of claim 10, wherein the smooth and lubricious surface contains atoms selected from the group consisting of sulfur and fluorine.

The surgical implant of claim 10, wherein the smooth and lubricious surface has been treated with a chemical reagent that creates crosslinking bonds between polymeric molecules.

The surgical implant of claim 10, wherein the implant has an anchoring surface provided with means for anchoring the implant to a prepared bone surface.

The surgical implant of claim 14, wherein the means for anchoring the implant to a prepared bone surface comprises pegs that are designed to fit into accommodating receptacles that can be inserted into a prepared bone surface prior to insertion of the surgical implant into an articulating joint.

The surgical implant of claim 10, wherein the implant has two smooth and lubricious surfaces, and is sized and designed to replace meniscal or labrum tissue. A surgical implant for replacing a cartilage segment that covers a hard bone surface, comprising: The surgical implant of claim 17, wherein at least one smooth surface contains atoms selected from the group consisting of sulfur and fluorine.

The surgical implant of claim 17, wherein at least one smooth surface has been treated with a chemical reagent that creates crosslinking bonds between polymeric molecules. The surgical implant of claim 17, also comprising a flexible reinforcing mesh embedded within at least a portion of said the hydrogel component.

The surgical implant of claim 17, wherein the flexible reinforcing mesh has at least one density or stiffness gradient between an articulating surface of said implant and an anchoring surface of said implant.

The surgical implant of claim 17, wherein the anchoring surface has pegs coupled thereto which are designed to fit into accommodating receptacles that can be inserted into a prepared bone surface prior to insertion of the surgical implant into an articulating joint. A surgical implant for replacing meniscal or labral cartilage in a mammalian synovial joint, comprising a hydrogel component that is sized and shaped for replacing a meniscal or labral cartilage segment, having at least one smooth surface for articulation following implantation, said smooth surface having a negative electrical charge density that promotes lubricious interactions with mammalian synovial fluid.

The surgical implant of claim 24, wherein at least one smooth surface contains atoms selected from the group consisting of sulfur and fluorine. The surgical implant of claim 24, wherein at least one smooth surface has been treated with a chemical reagent that creates crosslinking bonds between polymeric molecules.

The surgical implant of claim 24, also comprising a flexible reinforcing mesh embedded within at least a portion of said the hydrogel component. An anchoring system for a surgical implant that contains a hydrogel component, comprising: As used herein, all references to implants, surgery, etc.

As known in the art, hydrogels are materials that are somewhat flexible and pliable, and do not have rigid or crystalline structures. In hydrated form, they contain water molecules, which can permeate through a matrix i. In animals, nearly all types of soft tissues are hydrogels, with matrices made of collagen a bundled protein that provides tensile strength and proteoglycan filaments extremely thin protein strands surrounded by hyaluronate, a natural polymer.

Because natural tissues are hydrogels, many efforts have been made to use hydrogels as cell culture materials. While these materials have numerous laboratory uses, the use of hydrogel implants to replace injured or diseased cartilage, in surgery on humans, has been very limited, for a number of reasons.

The only sales of such hydrogel implants that are known to the Applicant are occurring in Europe, by a business venture involving Salumedica a European company and Arthrex an American company.

That approach suffers from shortcomings that limit its utility and effectiveness, notably including problems involving minor edges and noncomformities that lead to potentially abrasive surfaces around the periphery of any such inserted plug surrounded by cartilage.

Also, those implants are believed to be made of polyvinyl alcohol PVAwhich is not as strong or durable as other known hydrogel materials.

Another important distinction should be noted between those efforts, and the approach described herein.

Inability to synthesise hyaline cartilage

In essentially all cases, the implants described herein will be designed to completely replace an entire segment of cartilage such as an entire femoral runner, tibial plateau, or patellar surfacerather than attempting to insert a small plug or disc of synthetic hydrogel into a defect that will remain surrounded by natural cartilage.

Most hydrogels described in science or medical articles include hydrogels made of collagen, the natural protein that provides the matrix that surrounds and supports cells in nearly all soft tissues in animals. However, collagen hydrogels suffer from problems and limitations, if used in implants for replacing cartilage.

Accordingly, the Applicant has avoided collagen, and has focused instead on synthetic polymers for creating implants designed to last at least 10 years and preferably for the entire remaining life of the patient, especially in the case of elderly patients.

Although certain synthetic hydrogels such as polyhydroxy-ethyl-methacrylate are used for contact lenses and slow-release drug carriers, they are not strong or durable enough to replace hyaline cartilage.

Other biocompatible polymers are described in patents such as U. However, none of those are being used to replace hyaline cartilage in load-bearing joints, such as knees or hips. Instead, knee and hip replacements today use rigid metallic and plastic components. In a typical knee implant, the tibial bone in the shin is sawed off below the knee, and the entire upper segment of bone is replaced with a titanium alloy piece, with a high-density polyethylene HDPE plastic coating on the upper condyle, to provide the tibial plateau.Cartilage is a firm, flexible, connective tissue that lives between our bones and protects, cushions, and absorbs shock from the joints.

Cartilage allows our joints to move smoothly and without friction. And when injury penetrates subchondral bone, underlying marrow cells can be stimulated to provide some repair, but inevitably the fibrocartilage that results is a biomechanically inferior substitute for native, articular hyaline cartilage.

Synthesis of cartilage matrix by mammalian chondrocytes in vitro. III. Effects of ascorbate

The relatively early expression of cartilage specific markers by the implanted chondrocytes, coupled with the inability of untreated chondral defects to repair or regenerate, demonstrates the. Oct 31,  · MRI shows a chondral cartilage injury with a 1cm divot of cartilage and bone missing.

suggested surgery is microfracture surgery with weeks "off my feet" Not sure if it is worth it at age This long-term culture and the inability to synthesize a functional matrix starting with a relatively weak hydrogel alludes to the need for a different strategy and perhaps the need for material reinforcement to meet the functional demands of the joint.

inductive environment in vitro and in vivo promoting synthesis of cartilage tissue (Wu et al., , Correia et al., , Nehrer et al., , Welsch et al., ). In this study, we hypothesised that the presence of different GAGs within a CG scaffold would markedly.

Inability to synthesise hyaline cartilage
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